Homeschooling in Washington

Homeschooling: Socialization in the Real World

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"But What About Socialization?"
Are Your Children Socialized?
One mom shares her busy family's life and how they interact with each other and the world.
Homeschool Socialization: Life in the Real World Equals Real Socialization
Ann Brady
Park days, play dates and friends of all ages…that’s what homeschool socialization means to many family. Of course, when new homeschoolers start considering homeschooling, this is often one of the first concerns they have, and one of the first questions they are grilled with. “What about socialization?”
Homeschooled Kids: But What About Socialization?
Laura Osborne
What about socialization? This is one of the most common questions confronting homeschooling. Socialization is the process whereby the young of a culture learn the rules, mores, traditions, and acceptable interactions of their particular society. Regardless of being at home or at school, a child will be socialized. The question then seems to be: what is the best agent of socialization? Realizing that when a child graduates, he is never again cloistered in an environment with same-age peers makes one question the authenticity of the school as a superior socializing agent. But detractors ask, does the homeschool student do as well in measures of interpersonal and communication skills as his traditionally schooled peers? Let's look at the research.
Homeschooling Benefits: Children less preoccupied with peer acceptance
William R. Mattox Jr.
Most people who have never met a homeschooling family imagine that the kids are socially isolated. But some new research by Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute suggests otherwise. Indeed, Ray's research helps to explain why the number of homeschoolers in America continues to grow. Ray reports the typical homeschooled child is involved in 5.2 social activities outside the home each week. These activities include afternoon and weekend programs with conventionally schooled kids, such as ballet classes, Little League teams, Scout troops, church groups and neighborhood play. They include midday field trips and cooperative learning programs organized by groups of homeschooling families. For example, some Washington, D.C., families run a homeschool drama troupe that performs at a local dinner theater. So, what most distinguishes a homeschooler's social life from that of a conventionally schooled child? Ray says homeschooled children tend to interact more with people of different ages.
Home-Schooling: Socialization not a problem
Washington Times
One of the most persistent criticisms of home-schooling is the accusation that home-schoolers will not be able to fully participate in society because they lack “socialization.” It’s a challenge that reaches right to the heart of home-schooling, because if a child isn’t properly socialized, how will that child be able to contribute to society? Home-school families across the nation knew criticisms about adequate socialization were ill-founded — they had the evidence right in their own homes. In part to address this question from a research perspective, the Home School Legal Defense Association commissioned a study in 2003 titled “Homeschooling Grows Up,” conducted by Mr. Ray, to discover how home-schoolers were faring as adults. The news was good for home-schooling. In all areas of life, from gaining employment, to being satisfied with their home-schooling, to participating in community activities, to voting, home-schoolers were more active and involved than their public school counterparts.
It's a Myth That School is Good for Socialization
Penelope Trunk
Parents who have their kids in school often say they have them there because of socialization. It's absurd that homeschoolers talk to people of all ages, all day long, and kids in school have to listen to a teacher all day long. It's just not even a contest: homeschooling is better for socialization because parents value it so much and schools don't.
Let's Hope They're Not Socialized
Raising counter-cultural kids means that the traditional notion of socialization doesn't have much meaning. Centering on family rather than peer groups offers a new way of socialization.
Looking for the “S” Word: Socialization for the Homeschool Student
Veteran homeschoolers know that socialization is really not something to worry about in the homeschool, even for those who are moms to only children. The truth is children receive social instruction in the very environment where it is needed - society. As parents we are best equipped to direct the "socialization" of our children because we have their best interest at heart. Here are ten ways to find socialization opportunities for your homeschool student.
Making friends through homeschooling (without worrying about socialization)
Kara Anderson
Here’s the thing with socialization: We all know that true “socialization” is not just finding yourself in a group. “Socialization” as a homeschooling family is tricky: you can try to force it, and know the whole time that you are living in a contrived state that will please your family doctor and weird neighbor. But friendship is easier. You find people who like you. It may take a while, but the wait is worth it.
Oh NO! I forgot about Socialization!
When many people ask about homeschooling, usually one of the FIRST comments and/or questions they ask involves the big “s” word – Socialization. How do they get socialized if they don’t go to school? Don’t you worry that he won’t be socialized? The list goes on… Socialization is truly a myth that plagues the homeschool community.
Social Development and the Homeschooled Child
Dr. Scott Turansky
Many people cannot understand how a homeschooled child can have adequate social interaction with others. They imagine that these children must have little contact with others, day after day. But this is really a lack of understanding about what socialization really is and how it works in a homeschool environment. In this article, Dr. Scott Turansky challenges the assumptions about socialization and explains what really takes place in the typical homeschool.
Socialization: Homeschoolers Are in the Real World
Chris Klicka
Academically homeschoolers have generally excelled, but some critics have continued to challenge them on an apparent “lack of socialization” or “isolation from the world.” Often there is a charge that homeschoolers are not learning how to live in the “real world.” However, a closer look at public school training shows that it is actually public school children who are not living in the real world.
The 3 Biggest Social Benefits of Homeschooling
Alexandra Martinez
Without fail, telling someone you are homeschooling your children will promptly be followed by the question, "Aren't you worried about socialization?" Here are three social benefits to homeschooling.
The S-Word: Socialization for Homeschoolers
Why do homeschoolers hear socialization questions more than any others? In fact, very few of them are home long enough to be unsocialized!
The Truth About Homeschooling and Socialization
Usually what is meant by socialization or the lack thereof is that if we isolate our kids from the public or private school culture, our kids won’t know how to survive in the ‘real’ world. But the homeschool world has a lot more similarities to the ‘real world’ than any institutional setting.
The Truth about Homeschooling and Socialization
True socialization begins at home. Children do best with socialization when they have the freedom to take off when they are ready.
The Truth about Homeschooling and Socialization
Lucinda H Kennaley
The reality of homeschool socialization is that there are usually more opportunities to socialize than there is time. The crush of activities, friends, and interactions with others keeps most homeschoolers more than busy.
What About Socialization?
If only homeschoolers had a nickel for every time they heard the question, "... but what about socialization?" That infamous socialization question, for any seasoned homeschooler, is quite a humorous one! Although non-homeschoolers worry that homeschooling may turn children into social misfits, we know that the opposite is true and that positive socialization is one of the best reasons to homeschool your children.
What About Socialization?
Friends or relatives who’ve heard of your homeschooling plans may have already asked, “But what about socialization?” If you’re thinking about homeschooling, you might have even wondered this yourself. This continues to be one of the most commonly asked questions of homeschooling parents, despite decades of academic research and anecdotal evidence showing that homeschooled children are generally significantly better “socialized” than their institutionally-schooled counterparts. Each family will answer the question differently, but here’s some food for thought as you form your own views on socialization.
What Is Socialization Anyway?
Marci Goodwin
Many people seem to think that homeschool kids are all socially backward and sheltered. They feel that they need to be properly socialized or they won’t be able to function in the real world. And by properly socialized, they mean exposed to large groups of children their own age for 8+ hours per day so they can learn to act like the average child their age. Their question makes be wonder “What is socialization anyway?”


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